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Marijean

Whoops! I’m Two People on Facebook

By | Communications | 5 Comments

Do you have two profiles on Facebook? If you do, your intention was probably to have a “professional” profile and a “personal” one.

Guess what? This is what you’ve done instead: you have given others reason to have the following reactions:

  1. In a search, they are unsure which one of you to connect with — are you friends or professional contacts? Whose decision is that?
  2. Hey! I thought we were friends! Why now are you shifting me over to your “business” self?
  3. What are you up to personally that you feel like you need a totally different profile to protect your “private” self?
  4. You really don’t understand Facebook, do you?

None of the reactions others have to you and your dual Facebook personalities are positive, are they? Furthermore, why on earth do you want to complicate your life by having to manage two different profiles?

You’re also making yourself vulnerable by violating Facebook’s terms of service — you know, that thing you clicked YES to and never actually read? Here’s a section:

See that part about not creating more than one account? If you end up having a hacking problem or other security breach, you’re going to have a really tough time getting anyone at Facebook to help you if you’ve violated any of these items. Just sayin’.

How to Stop Being Two People on Facebook

You’re going to have to deactivate one of your personalities. More than likely, its the newer one, the one you decided to create for a more “professional” appearance. Log in to that account.

Go to Account –> Account Settings –> Deactivate Account.

Now, I understand that you still have this conflict; that there are parts of your life you want to share with friends but not necessarily colleagues or business prospects. The way to manage that is with lists.

This will help: How to Create Lists, Save Some Privacy on Facebook in Five Easy Steps.

Really! Do it today!

Read this, too: My friend Michelle (Golden) Rivers has a great post on this topic as well — Managing Your “Private Life on Facebook While Developing Business.

Google to Save America with New Job Search Function

By | Communications, Social Media | No Comments

The announcement came from Google this week: Google is going to make America great again help Americans find work. Could Google, with its new job search function, pulling in job listings by geography into a user’s search results, be the tool that helps people throughout the United States find the work they seek?

As a search engine, Google has proven it is the best. Google is a full 43% ahead of its nearest competition, Bing. With stats like that, you have to wonder, why do other search engines even bother? I, for one, have never heard anyone speak of a “Bing ranking.”

The job search function is really promising. It’s rather time consuming to go from site to site (LinkedIn, Ziprecruiter, Snagajob, Glassdoor, and many more) in one’s job search. Streamlining the process can only help the unemployed or dissatisfied find their next, great opportunity faster.  In a quick test, I searched Marketing Jobs in Charlottesville and got back a solid list of opportunities, the first several the most recent and relevant, in under a second. The second page of results provided a dropdown that displayed employers and let me filter out different parameters. Pretty nifty.

It still takes the future employed persons of America following through, applying, showing up for interviews and doing a good job when they get hired, but I have hope that this will benefit some seekers to get off the couch and into the office.

To All Ye in a Job Search Panic

By | Social Media | 4 Comments

Hi there!

I know you’re freaking out because you thought you’d have a job by now. But what’s really happened is that you’re at the bottom of a hill looking up, and you’re not really sure now how you’re going to get to the top because that hill just keeps getting bigger.

I get it.

I hear how you’ve been “networking,” by asking people to coffee and lunch, asking to pick the brains of others (what are you, a zombie?).

I want you to stop a second. Back up. Google Thyself. Do you like what shows up? Have you paid attention to it? Do you have a LinkedIn profile? Are you proud of it? Is there nothing, or not much at all to find? That says something, too, you know.

Here are 12 Things to Do on Your LinkedIn Profile Today. 

What are you doing with your resume? Is it searchable? As in, is there an online version of it? Have you bought the domain that is your full name? Do that. It’s inexpensive. And then put your resume on it. I promise there’s someone you know who can help you with this. Ask a high school kid.

You’ve done all that? Great. Now, start working on what I call the “Five a Day” plan. FIVE. Reach out to (see in person, call, write a letter, send an email, text, bake a pie and deliver it) five people for help in your job search. Five. A day. Seriously.

Expand your thinking. Be open to new ideas. Perfect is the enemy of great and other buzzy workplace platitudes. Just get in there and stop panicking.

There’s a lid for every pot. Go find your lid.

Then come back here and tell me how you found it.

 

United’s PR Opportunity

By | Communications, Public Relations | 2 Comments

Some people like to play fantasy baseball. I play fantasy public relations.

By now, you’ve heard about the doctor who was forcibly dragged from his United flight to Louisville, Ky when a flight was oversold and seats needed to be made available to United staff.

 

In the wake of the incident, the airline’s CEO released a statement that surely, no PR professional touched.

 

There’s universal agreement among PR pros and the general public that this was a PR failure of epic proportions.

What United Should Do Now

  1. Apologize for the mistreatment of a passenger and take steps to insure nothing like this ever happens again.
  2. Stop overselling flights, and lead the industry in changing policies to make air travel humane, courteous, and pleasant again. (This is where the fantasy comes in because airlines will always oversell flights, hedging against no-shows and missed connections, to make the most money possible on every flight).
  3. Ask the CEO to step down. This guy is a disaster in a crisis. Not what you want in an airline.

If United does this, and puts in place a new CEO with a strong relationship to their PR team, they will be on track to salvage what has become a terrible reputation. The likelihood that any of this will occur is small, because, realistically, our attention span for this kind of thing is short. As passengers, we have limited choices of airlines going to the destinations we seek. We need to select the least expensive option when we shop for airline tickets and our morals will only last so long when we need to fly somewhere. We will keep flying United, even if, for now, we’re determined to do otherwise.

The Importance of Asking for What you Want

By | Marketing, Public Relations | No Comments

In 2010, after working remotely from Virginia for a firm in St. Louis for five years, I decided I just couldn’t do it anymore. The flights, often delayed, once a month back to Missouri, the isolation of being the only person on the team not in St. Louis, and the lack of control over the client work had taken a toll. I knew I could continue my local client work as an independent and began to consider opening my own firm.

There was one big problem. Like most people working for PR firms and agencies, I had signed a non-compete agreement stating that the clients belonged to the firm. Most such agreements require a one-year period in which the former employee steer clear of the firm’s clients. I was prepared to do this, if necessary, but hoped it wouldn’t be.

Since I moved to Charlottesville, every local client I’d gained had a relationship with just me. They knew other members of the firm a little bit, but I was the one who met with the clients regularly, who corresponded with them, and provided the bulk of the deliverables. If I left the firm, who would continue to take care of those clients?

I took a deep breath and I asked my boss to be released from my non-compete. I asked to take my clients with me, allowing me to start my own business. I promised to continue to serve other clients as a subcontractor to the firm and to ease transition.

It was a crazy thing to propose.

But she said yes. That client work gave Jaggers Communications a healthy start. Clients said they didn’t care to what account they wrote their checks, all they knew is they wanted to continue working with me.

Just ask.